Management of phreatophyte and riparian vegetation for maximum multiple use values by Jerome S. Horton

Cover of: Management of phreatophyte and riparian vegetation for maximum multiple use values | Jerome S. Horton

Published by Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Fort Collins, Colo .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Vegetation surveys,
  • Phreatophytes,
  • Riparian ecology

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 20-23).

Book details

Statementby Jerome S. Horton and C.J. Campbell.
SeriesResearch paper RM -- 117., Research paper RM -- 117.
ContributionsCampbell, C. J., Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Fort Collins, Colo.)
The Physical Object
Pagination23 p. :
Number of Pages23
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17616877M
OCLC/WorldCa15177074

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Horton, J.S., and Campbell, C.J.,Management of phreatophyte and riparian vegetation for maximum multiple use values: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest.

Management of phreatophyte and riparian vegetation for maximum multiple use values by Horton, Jerome S. (Jerome Sweet), ; Campbell, C.

J; Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Fort Collins, Colo.) cnPages: Management of phreatophyte and riparian vegetation for maximum multiple use values. Related Titles. Series: USDA Forest Service research paper RM ; By.

Horton, Jerome S. (Jerome Sweet), Campbell, C. Get this from a library. Management of phreatophyte and riparian vegetation for maximum multiple use values.

[Jerome S Horton; C J Campbell; United States. Department of Agriculture.; Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Fort Collins, Colo.)]. Management of phreatophyte and riparian vegetation for maximum multiple use values / By Jerome S.

(Jerome Sweet) Horton, C. Campbell and Colo.) Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Fort by: Management of phreatophyte and riparian vegetation for maximum multiple use values.

USDA For. Ser. Res. Paper RM, Rocky Mountain For. and Rng. Exp. Sta., Fort Collins, Colo. Google Scholar Jackson, W. L., S. Hudson, and K. Gebhardt. Considerations in Rangeland Watershed Monitoring.

Management of phreato- phyte and riparian vegetation for maximum multiple use values. U.S. Dep River Basin due to their potential impacts on native riparian vegetation [3] [4][5.

Pacific Southwest Inter-agency Committee. “Vegetation Management on Flood Plains and Riparian Lands”.

Phreatophyte Symposium Meeting, Al-buquerque, New Mexico. Qashu, H.K. and Evans, D.D. “Water Disposition in a Stream Channel with riparian Vegetation”. Proceedings of the Society of American Soil Scientists, Vol-ume Management of phreatophyte and riparian vegetation for maximum multiple use values.

Remote mapping of saltcedar in the Rio Grande system of west Texas Salix tended to exhibit tissue water relations values that were intermediate between those of Tamarix, a salt-tolerant facultative phreatophyte, and Populus, a mesophytic obligate phreatophyte.

Horton JS, Campbell CJ. Management of phreatophyte and riparian vegetation for maximum multiple use values. Res. Pap. RM Fort Collins, CO: USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station.

23 p. Horton JS, Mounts FC, Kraft JM. Seed germination and seedling establishment of phreatophyte species. Stn. Pap. vegetation resources in riparian areas.

The vegetation cross-section method evaluates the health of vegetation across the valley floor. The greenline method provides a measurement of the streamside vegetation. The woody species regeneration method measures. A phreatophyte is a deep-rooted plant that obtains a significant portion of the water that it needs from the phreatic zone (zone of saturation) or the capillary fringe above the phreatic zone.

Phreatophytes are plants that are supplied with surface water and often have their roots constantly in touch with moisture. A phreatophyte is one that absorbs its water from a constant source on the ground. Non-native phreatophyte control is occurring mainly in major land resource areas: “Southern Desert” and “Pecos Management of phreatophyte and riparian vegetation for maximum multiple use values book Canadian Plains and Valleys.” Attributes of Planting Riparian Vegetation After Clearing • Accelerate succession to protect river or stream bank from erosion • Select desirable vegetation instead of allowing perennial or.

John C. Stella, Jacob Bendix, in Multiple Stressors in River Ecosystems, Water Withdrawal and Water Stress. Riparian vegetation invariably occupies the portion of the landscape that is most likely to have available groundwater, either near the surface or at least within the reach of phreatophytes (Stromberg et al., ).Riparian plants, many of which depend on perennial.

Phreatophytes in the Bible Phreatophytes in the Bible Ross, Benjamin David Deming, History Editor Not only has the Hebrew Bible had an enormous influence on Western civilization as a sacred text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam but it also has value as a source of information on the culture of ancient times.

Among the fields of knowledge. Woody riparian vegetation height was classified above each transect endpoint at bank‐full as follows: – m, – m, – m, – m, – m, and > m (Burton et al.

We computed percent woody riparian vegetation as the percent of transect endpoints with woody vegetation greater than 1 m in height. Horton, J. and C. Cambell. Management of phreatophyte and riparian vegetation from maximum multiple use values. US Forest Service Research Paper RM pp.

Horton, J. S., F. Mounts, and J. Kraft. Riparian Plant Management - Controls for Vegetation in Watercourses.

Laura Thomas. • Aquatic and riparian vegetation • Algae • Non-native invasive bankside species • Canals Maximum (m) Minimum (mm) Maximum (mm) Minimum (mm) Maximum (mm) Is machine access. Vegetation Management for Increased Water Yield in Arizona, by Peter F.

Ffolliott and David B. Thorud, Arizona Agricultural Experiment Station, Technical Bulletin 2 1 5, 38 pp., This state-of-the-art assessment of the potentials for increas-ing water yield in Arizona by means of vegetation management. Riparian vegetation departure index The riparian vegetation departure index (RVD) is a ratio that is similar to the ‘observed’ to ‘expected’ (‘O/E’) type metrics used in environmental condition assessments (e.g., Hawkins et al., ).

RVD characterizes riparian vegetation condition for a given stream. in western riparian ecosystems. More gener-ally, understanding the processes that form vegetation patches along southwestern rivers, as well as the range of abiotic and biotic con-ditions associated with the patches, also can aid management efforts.

For example, studies of vegetation patterns and processes at conser. Management of phreatophyte and riparian vegetation for maximum multiple use values View Metadata By: Horton, Jerome S. (Jerome Sweet), - Campbell, C.

- Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Fort Collins, Colo.). management through restoration activities.” (USDI, BLM ).

Project Location The planning area includes all lands within the Bureau of Land Management, Medford District (Map 1). The vast majority of projects would occur within the riparian reserve land use allocation on public lands. J.C. Horton, C.J.

CampbellManagement of phreatophyte and riparian vegetation for maximum multiple use values United States Forest Service Research Paper RM (), pp. CrossRef View Record in Scopus Google Scholar. Horton, J.S.

and C.J. Campbell () Management of phreatophyte and riparian vegetation for maximum multiple use values. S.D.A. Forest Service, Res.

Papr. RM, 23 p. TOPICS Streamside Vegetation, Multiple Use RIPARIAN BIBLIOGRAPHY (09/19/86) p age 19 Key Words: cottonwood, populus angustifolia, season of use, southwest, New Mexico, cattle Riparian vegetation is vital for the maintenance of stream and riparian ecosystems (Goodwin et al.Kovalchik and ElmoreMillarMurphy and Meehan ).

Streamside vege-tation stabilizes channel banks with root systems, attenuates the. JOURNAL OF RANGE MANAGEMENT 43(4), July in Utah (Platts and Nelson ). Resource managers need to know what the responses of degraded riparian areas will be to elimination or reduction of livestock use.

Most of the research on riparian areas has been. At the same time, society values riparian areas for production of food and fiber, access to transportation, opportunities for recreation, and natural scenic beauty. This report examines the structure and functioning of riparian areas, how they have been altered by human activity, their legal status, and their potential for management and.

Management of phreatophyte and riparian vegetation for maximum multiple use. Managing riparian zones for fish and wildlife in eastern Oregon and eastern Washington. A paper delivered at regional Society for Range Management meetings. Management of riparian vegetation in ways that optimize their value as habitat for plants and animals will require planning and action at both site-specific and landscape scales.

In addition, more integrated management that uses a functional approach and seeks to optimize habitats for a variety of native species is needed. Riparian vegetation plays a vital role in inhibiting soil and water loss, but few studies have quantified the relationships between vegetation spatial pattern and the hydraulic characteristics of upslope runoff.

This study investigated how hydraulic characteristics (e.g., runoff coefficient, flow regime, flow resistance, and flow shear stress of overland flow) responded to differences in. Forest Terminology for Multiple-Use Management1 William Hubbard, Christopher Latt, Alan Long2 1. This document is SS-FOR, one of a series of the School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, and the Florida Forest Stewardship Program.

Phreatophytic riparian vegetation relies heavily on ground water transported from upstream sources. In the American southwest, the phenology of native phreatophytes, e.g., Rio Grande cottonwood, (Populus deltoides) is also dependent on seasonal flooding, which has been greatly diminished by hydrologic alterations and competing allocations.

In this semi-arid, water-scarce region, a long history. THE ROLE OF RIPARIAN VEGETATION IN PROTECTING AND IMPROVING CHEMICAL WATER QUALITY IN STREAMS1 Michael G. Dosskey, Philippe Vidon, Noel P. Gurwick, Craig J. Allan, Tim P. Duval, and Richard Lowrance2 ABSTRACT: We review the research literature and summarize the major processes by which riparian vegetation.

animals, managing riparian zones as special use pastures, and several basic range practices (e.g. salting, artificial reestablishment of riparian vegetation, upland water developments, and herders). However, the expansion of non‐native vegetation cover along multiple low‐order streams could have considerable impact on downstream water discharge into higher order streams, a point that must be taken into account in order to accurately calculate riparian vegetation impacts on basin‐wide hydrology.

[37] 2. The expanded use of biological. Riparian Forest Management shown nationally that compliance with BMPs is relatively high (Hook et al. ; Adams and Hook ,; Henson ,; and Carraway et al. However, by definition, BMPs were designed to protect water quality, not the other functions and values of riparian.

riparian flora, although many genera have invaded across regions. Plant species in all regions are adapted to multiple abiotic stressors, including dynamic flood-ing and sediment regimes, seasonal water shortage, and fire. The most severe human impacts are from land-use conversion to agriculture, streamflow regulation.

Vegetation in the riparian zone (the area immediately adjacent to streams, such as stream banks) along the Colorado River downstream of Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona, supports many ecosystem and societal functions.

In both Glen Canyon and Grand Canyon, this ecosystem has changed over time in response to flow alterations, invasive species, and recreational use. Great Basin Riparian Ecosystems addresses restoration over a variety of scales and integrates work from multiple disciplines, including riparian ecology, paleoecology, geomorphology, and hydrology.

While the focus is on the Great Basin, the general approach is widely applicable, as it describes a promising new strategy for developing. Results. δ 15 N and %N in foliage, and %cover of soil nitrogen indicators differed across the waterfall barrier to salmon at each watershed.

δ 15 N values were enriched by ‰ to ‰ below the falls depending on species and watershed, providing a relative contribution of marine-derived nitrogen (MDN) to vegetation of 10% to 60%.

%N in foliar tissues was slightly higher below the falls. Horton, J. S. The development and perpetuation of the permanent tamarisk type in the phreatophyte zone of the southwest.

USDA For. Serv. Paper RM, 3 pp. Horton, J. S. & C. J. Campbell. Management of phreatophyte and riparian vegetation for maximum multiple use values. USDA For. Serv. Paper RM, 23 pp.A riparian zone or riparian area is the interface between land and a river or stream.

Riparian is also the proper nomenclature for one of the terrestrial biomes of the Earth. Plant habitats and communities along the river margins and banks are called riparian vegetation, characterized by hydrophilic an zones are important in ecology, environmental resource management, and civil.

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